less is more

Yesterday, my mother in law walked into my house and said, “Your house looks bigger.”

And, although I hadn’t noticed it before that, she was right. It DID look bigger. Why was that?

Well, I had purged tons of items out of our house. I mean, HUGE piles of unused things left our house this summer. And what was left behind was all this open, airy space. You see, I no longer feel the need to fill every wall with a piece of furniture and something hanging on the wall.

Instead, I let my house breath. In return, that allows me to breath.

Yesterday. I also read an article on Becoming Minimalist titled Reconsidering the Merits of Slow Acquisition which I loved, so when my mother in law made that observation I was downright proud. I had pared down our possessions to only those we needed and/or loved. (The hubby helped too.) Joshua Becker, who runs Becoming Minimalist, is a wealth of inspiration, by the way. Check him out here.

So I had this epiphany:

Everyone (ok, maybe just some people) want a larger house.

What if……..people just had less stuff?

Then our houses would feel and look larger and we wouldn’t be striving to spend more money on larger and more expensive real estate. I know this idea will be very strange to some people, but others will think it is charming.

I strive to be a minimalist, There are different levels of minimalism, and I would say I am about medium at this point. This level makes me happy right now.

And I will never live in a tiny house. Why?

You can live a more minimalist (simple, uncluttered) lifestyle without living in a tiny house. While I see the merits of a tiny house for some people, that just doesn’t work for some of us. Instead, a average size house can become an oasis of peace and tranquility when you remove all the unnecessary distractions.

At least, it is working great so far for us.

If you have any thoughts on this I would love to hear them below.

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