Why It’s So Hard to Become a Minimalist

Why It's So Hard to Become a Minimalist

Okay, let’s face it.

It’s hard to BECOME a minimalist. It is much easier to BE a minimalist. So what’s the difference, you might ask….

Momentum. That’s what.

When you first make the decision to become less stressed, less hurried, less pressured – less everything bad –  it is difficult to really get started. Things go through your head like, “What will my friends think?” or “My mother-in-law will really have bad things to say about me now!”

It goes on and on.

You suddenly freak out because everyone will know you are different, and not different in an avant-gard, hip sort of way, but DIFFERENT!

To that, everyone who has ever become a successful minimalist would say, “Who Cares?”

As it turns out, the most difficult part of becoming a minimalist is not doing without things (which can actually enhance your life), it’s worrying about what other people will think.

However, it is much easier to ignore that opinions (and perceived opinions) of others after you have been living the minimalist lifestyle for a while.

Minimalism: The Art of NOT Caring About What People Think

Not caring about what other people think (or say) is an art in its own right. It takes some practice to get really good at it, but with a small amount of effort you can live completely free from the worries of other people’s hang ups.

There are several things you must consider that will help you get over this hurdle.

  • People are going to talk no matter what you do. This is true about most people on the planet because people just love to talk about other people. Simply file this knowledge away and decide there is nothing you can (or should) do about it. Then do whatever makes you happy.

 

  • You don’t know most of what they say, so it doesn’t hurt you anyway. As far as I know, no one has ever fallen over dead because someone talked about them behind their backs. Sticks and stones, baby!

 

  • Most people don’t mean most of what they say anyway. It’s true. I truly believe that people rattle on half of the time just trying to make conversation and give little thought to the potential impact of the conversation on those around them.

 

  • Once you get truly engaged in your minimalist lifestyle, you will be so happy that you won’t notice any of the talk (or other negativity) around you.  I realize that humans have a built in trait that makes us want everyone to like and approve of us all the time. Let’s all acknowledge right now that it’s not a possibility. Once you make that conscious realization, your happiness meter will start to rise.

 

  • You might be paranoid. People might not be saying as much as you think. After all, everyone has their own life to live and your life is probably not as important to them as you might suspect.

 

  • If people ARE talking, it’s probably because they are jealous. It’s true. Jealousy is the Number 1 reason why people talk about other people. In other words, if you are living a successful, happy minimalist life and others are talking negatively about you, its likely because they want the same life you have and probably don’t know how to attain it for themselves.

 

So you see, there really is not good reason not to jump headfirst into the minimalist lifestyle if it appeals to you. Just put everything in perspective about those around you and all the fear melts away. You really DON’T have to consider what other people will thing, say, or do when designing your perfect (or close to perfect) life.

 

Advertisers Lie

advertisers lie

Advertisers lie.

That’s not news to most people.

We all know that drinking a certain soda will not give you more friends or driving a certain car will not make you happier. (You can be miserable driving a Bugatti.)

So how is it that we all fall prey to a certain amount of their brainwashing?

It is repetitive exposure. They bombard us with a product or campaign over and over until it finally sinks into our brain. For example, how many times have you started to purchase a product or service and went with a company just because you had “heard of it” before?

We feel comfortable doing business with companies we feel we know. That’s why big companies keep getting bigger. We want to use who or what everyone else is using. On some level we feel there is security in numbers. Even in shopping.

But what does this have to do with advertisers lying?

Plenty!

For one thing, advertisers try to sell us things we don’t need. Period.

Here are a few thoughts for consideration:

  1. You don’t need a new phone (latest model) when yours works fine.
  2. Your don’t have to get a new car because your sister/friend/neighbor got one.
  3. Having more “stuff” doesn’t make you the winner.
  4. Nobody really cares how much your watch/purse/shoes/golf clubs cost.

The bottom line is: More is not better. It’s just more.

In fact, “more” gets a lot of people in trouble. More debt, more stress, etc.

But what does it do to advertisers when we decide to stop buying more of their products? It costs them money, of course. So what do they do in return? Advertisers lie. Some more.

They need us to keep buying so they can keep making money. And they will make you feel left out if you don’t purchase their product. They will pressure you into spending money you shouldn’t.

In my opinion, they really showed how low they could go when they started advertising directly to children. What person can market unhealthy foods and brain dampening toys to little kids and still sleep at night?

Don’t fall prey to their pressure. You are the boss of you. And you know what you need…..and what you don’t.

Don’t clutter you home or your life.

Why Too Many Choices Can Be a Bad Thing

why too many choices can be a bad thing

Today I want to discuss why too many choices can be a bad thing.

I recently decided it was time to purchase a new computer. So I did what most anyone would do. I went online and started looking for deals on laptops. But it soon became clear that I could not make a decision with so much information coming at me.

Then I decided to go to some good old fashioned brick and mortar stores. But every time I found a laptop that might be “the one” I would start to wonder what offerings were available at the next store down the street. I finally gave up and went home for the day – no closer to getting a new laptop and no longer wanting to deal with it.

I actually told my hubby I wished he would just pick one for me and buy it. He did not like that idea as much as I did, so I am currently sitting here typing this post on my old computer.

I am usually a quite decisive person. This is one of my better qualities (don’t ask about the bad ones), but sometimes the sheer number of choices in our world can overwhelm anyone.

Our super-consumer driven society would have us believe that infinite choices and possibilities equals infinite happiness, but that is truly not so.

For example, years ago when my grandparents wanted to purchase new furniture or appliances they went down to the local store (there was only one) and looked through the handful of choices . They picked what they wanted, paid for it, and took it home. It was that simple. And life went on as usual.

Similar purchases for us have taken weeks or even months.

Why?

Because not only are there lots of choices, but many stores carry the exact same thing and we need to make sure another stores doesn’t sell it cheaper, right?

But the endless choices don’t just extend to consumer goods. These days every choice becomes a process in frustration.

Career choices can be daunting with so many new fields emerging. I constantly hear about jobs that I never knew existed. (You can get paid for that?)

And how about that online dating? Now, you don’t just choose a mate from those in the vicinity of where you live. There are thousands or possibly millions of potential companions all around the world. No wonder so many people are single these days.

So how do we cope with all this clutter of possibilities? (And, yes, this IS a type of clutter.)

I think we must limit our pool of choices ourselves. We must be mindful of wanting to simplify the process of making choices.

I sometimes decide to buy something (after debating whether I really need it) and decide I will only shop on Amazon for that item. I usually find exactly what I need. I don’t check any other sites and I don’t second guess my choice. I give myself permission not worry about whether there is a better one out there. Or cheaper one.

Then I proceed to enjoy the new item without any stress attached to it.

It’s small things like this that have made my life more peaceful. After all, it’s the small things that usually impact our lives the most.

Further reading:

Less Is More

Less Is More

Yesterday, my mother in law walked into my house and said, “Your house looks bigger.”

And, although I hadn’t noticed it before that, she was right. It DID look bigger. Why was that?

Well, I had purged tons of items out of our house. I mean, HUGE piles of unused things left our house this summer. And what was left behind was all this open, airy space. You see, I no longer feel the need to fill every wall with a piece of furniture and something hanging on the wall.

Instead, I let my house breath. In return, that allows me to breath.

Yesterday. I also read an article on Becoming Minimalist titled Reconsidering the Merits of Slow Acquisition which I loved, so when my mother in law made that observation I was downright proud. I had pared down our possessions to only those we needed and/or loved. (The hubby helped too.) Joshua Becker, who runs Becoming Minimalist, is a wealth of inspiration, by the way. Check him out here.

So I had this epiphany:

Everyone (ok, maybe just some people) want a larger house.

What if……..people just had less stuff?

Then our houses would feel and look larger and we wouldn’t be striving to spend more money on larger and more expensive real estate. I know this idea will be very strange to some people, but others will think it is charming.

I strive to be a minimalist, There are different levels of minimalism, and I would say I am about medium at this point. This level makes me happy right now.

And I will never live in a tiny house. Why?

You can live a more minimalist (simple, uncluttered) lifestyle without living in a tiny house. While I see the merits of a tiny house for some people, that just doesn’t work for some of us. Instead, a average size house can become an oasis of peace and tranquility when you remove all the unnecessary distractions.

At least, it is working great so far for us.

If you have any thoughts on this I would love to hear them below.

Further reading:

Why You Must Be Kind To Be a Minimalist

why you must be kind to be a minimalist

My husband and I always notice how most dog owners are friendly, outgoing people. It is quite unusual (at least in our part of the country) to see anyone walking a dog who doesn’t have pleasant demeanor and a kind word for anyone passing by.

Our theory is that dog owners:

  1. Are drawn to the fun loving attributes of dogs because they exhibit those traits themselves.
  2. Are less stressed because dogs provide stress relief in their lives by way of closeness and silliness.

The same goes for minimalists.

Well, not exactly…..but sort of.

Minimalist are also friendly, outgoing people. And it is also for similar reasons to dog lovers. In fact, minimalist often ARE dog lovers.

Stay with me here…..I’m going somewhere with this……I promise.

You see, being a minimalist allows you to strip away all the things in your life that are not important. And believe me, there are lots more unimportant things in our lives than most of us realize.

When you get rid of the things that are not important and only the good things remain, then you will become a more relaxed, happier person. Your joy will begin to overflow. Then the most amazing thing will happen. You will suddenly be super nice to everyone around you…..even complete strangers!

So you really shouldn’t ask why you must be kind to be a minimalist, but rather, how can you be a minimalist and not be kind?

As for dogs, as a semi minimalist (I’m still working on it) I find that a dog (or in my case 2) are essential to my happiness. When I strip everything away, my fur babies are on my top ten list of things that make me happy. They are a part of our family, and they bring joy to everyone in our home. (It’s like having two more kids that you don’t have to start college funds for.)

Besides, I truly believe that way deep down, even the meanest, nastiest person really wants to be kind to other people. When we take away all the clutter and see our lives clearly, then love and kindness stand above all else.

And, really, nothing else truly matters.

Having Memories Is Better Than Having Stuff

why having memories is better than having stuff

This is going to be short and sweet.

Having memories will always be better than having stuff. Always.

Over the years people have decided to rebel against the so called “American Dream” and define their lives with a new set of values. The Great Recession, as it is now labeled, has become a driving force for this.

The Millennials have one thing in common with survivors of the Holocaust. They have figured out that some things can’t be taken away from you.

Holocaust survivors learned that possessions could be taken away, but educations and vocations for individuals, such as doctors, lawyers, and scientists, couldn’t be taken away. This is why so many of these survivors encouraged their children and grandchildren to educate themselves in this way so they could always have a certain level of security in their future no matter what might come. (They could always go somewhere new and start over. They sort of carried their security with them, so to speak.)

Fast forward a few decades and a different generation has learned a similar lesson although from entirely less traumatic circumstances.

Houses can be foreclosed on and vehicles can be repossessed, but experiences can never be taken away from you.

Just think on that one for a moment.

I know lots of people right now who wish they had spent their money on dream family vacations instead of over sized houses that were repossessed during the financial crises. Or luxury cars. Or boats, Or expensive jewelry. Or designer clothes. Or ______________. (You fill in the blank.)

Now, instead of having lovely family vacation memories, all they have are regrets over bad choices and digging out of a financial hole.

So buy a nice house that suits your needs, not your wants. Buy a a good, dependable car (if you live where you need one). Take care of your basic needs and make yourself happy. Having memories is better than having stuff.

Don’t do anything to impress anybody. Only do things to make yourself and your family happy.

Then go have some experiences and make some memories.